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The Invasion of The Sacred Clown [Open]


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#1
Heyoka

Heyoka
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Miles across the Pacific Ocean, in North America, coyotes lived wild, terrorizing humans, reminding them that they weren't the most clever species, or the most resourceful, on the planet. However, people, with their strange ways, liked animal pelts, though as far as Heyoka could see, they didn't really need them. At any rate, two coyotes from America were now loose in Japan. They were far from native, but that meant very little to them. Coyotes didn't need to be native to survive here. Humans would rue the day they escaped from their cages in the fur farm.

Heyoka had stayed with his brother for some time, but the two had split up. Riv, the melanistic coyote, would probably have an easier time passing as some sort of dog, even though he was less than approachable. Heyoka, on the other hand, was far bolder, always pushing the boundaries, testing the waters, trying new things. Riv would probably stay away from humans, hide and never be seen. Heyoka had already been raiding villages like a plundering pirate. He had wandered off because it was obvious the humans were catching on that something was off. They were smart, but he had to be smarter to stay alive. They hadn't seen him. Yet. He planned on keeping it that way.

It was refreshing being able to lope through wilderness. Though the western coyote had never actually seen the lands his kind were from, his ingrained instincts made him a formidable threat to the native wildlife. He had never hunted before he escaped, and he was still quite clumsy, but he was doing better. He learned fast, and he felt assured that if he needed food terribly bad, he'd find his way back to some humans and eat some more cat food.

It was well established that dogs hated him. He wasn't sure why really. Perhaps it was just that he smelled wild, and not normal. Well he liked dogs just fine, unless they were being troublesome. The ones he had observed in the village seemed pretty soft. Some were downright edible, and he would know. He did know. Strange that dogs could be so delicious, considering some didn't look so different than a coyote. More people meddling, Heyoka thought. People loved to meddle in animal business. He huffed, and sprang up on top of a large rock. His thick winter fur was shedding out, and he looked particularly rangy, with tufts of thick downy coat sticking out at odd angles. Heyoka reached around to chew at an itchy spot on his back. He could barely reach it, and was practically folded in half, raking his front teeth over the spot. Satisfied that he had taken care of the itch, he straightened out, stretched, and hopped down from the rock.

The coyote's yellowish-green eyes scanned the landscape curiously. It was lush, green, full of life, and smelled strongly of dogs. Oddly enough, it didn't smell strongly of humans. From what Heyoka had gathered from being loose was that, as a general rule, to smell dogs generally meant to smell humans. The two species were always together, and Heyoka could see the appeal, but he preferred to simply use the humans to his advantage, not get cozy with them. And humans didn't want to get cozy with coyotes, they wanted to kill them.

With no human scents around, Heyoka decided to try something he hadn't done yet. It hadn't seemed safe, and there was no one to call to, or to announce to, and since it hadn't been safe, there was no need to simply howl to howl. However, Heyoka wanted to see if these strong dog smells had any faces nearby, and he had an idea how to rattle their cages, so to speak. He threw back his head and howled a high pitch, yappy, coyote howl. It was something Japan's creatures had never heard in the wild, and quite possibly a sound they might, one day, wish had never been voiced.

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#2
Kay

Kay
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I walked ten thousand miles, ten thousand miles to see you,
And every gasp of breath I grabbed at just to find you,

{{OCC: ----'}}

I climbed up every hills to get to you,
I wondered ancient lands to hold just you.

So this was it, the starting of the journey that probably would take the rest of Kay's life to complete. No, it certainly would take all of his life. He kept his nose the ground and walked very slowly, counting his evenly spaced steps so that he would be sure not to lose count. Oh the beating one would have to deal with if they distracted poor Kay! Then again it didn't take much to get on Kay's bad side-simply calling him 'Kay' seemed to be bad. The border collie mix much preferred to go by K., and even though the two names were not so different, K. seemed to know when you used one or the other, and acted accordingly. His mind was very focused, his thoughts only thinking of numbers as they slowly increased and he made his way through a wilderness of green and rock. More than once he nearly tripped over a stone that had decided to place itself right in front of him, but K. continued on. He wasn't like other wild dogs, he hardly cared about anything, really, when it came to Ohu or its stories. The less he had to do with them the better, for they would only get in his way and mislead him. Because of this, K. did not once stop to think that he was not alone amongst all these obstacles.

Suddenly his quiet, his paradise was shattered. His mind's carefully crafted numbers shook and fell apart. What number he was on hardly mattered now-what mattered was that sound! That cacophony that ruined K.'s mind and made him lose count. A human may have had it easier with keeping track of their numbers and measuring land, but K. was not a human, he was a canine and was forced to obey the limits of nature with what he could or could not do. It didn't matter who or what made the disgusting racket, K. may have known it to be a coyote-he had traveled far and wide, hadn't he?-but he didn't care if it was a coyote, a bear, or some other behemoth. All he wanted to know was why some fellow thought it okay to just burst out with such a voice and disrupt his careful calculations. He would have to restart now, wouldn't he? K, sighed and looked behind him into the darkness that the green created and became even angrier. One could follow his paw prints all the way back to the edge of Ohu's territory, perhaps even further. He wasn't going to abandon his quest, not now, but he had to speak to that thing-whoever he or she may be-and ask why on earth they thought it wise to call out like that.

His idea in mine, the collie mix ran toward the scent and smell of Heyoka. It may have not been wise to be so angry against a coyote, but what did K. care? He would have challenged God himself if he had been the cause of the sound that stopped his concentration. K. may have been able to focus and becomes obsessive very easily, but sharp, loud sounds like the howl Heyoka produced easily pierced his ears and distracted him. Maybe if Heyoka would have been in pain, or some other danger, K. would have nodded and moved on. It was not K.'s nature to offer help, but he would have understood the cause and pardoned the poor creature. However Heyoka was in no trouble whatsoever! What drove a healthy creature to make such a noise? So K. stopped at the bottom of the rock and glared up at the coyote with his one brown and one blue eyes. "Why must you howl so? Why must you create such an infernal racket? There is no moon, no one in danger. Do you simply like to cause discomfort to others?" His voice was accusatory, angry, but K. was more talk than walk. He wasn't built for fighting, he was built for herding-and in K.'s case-for walking and counting for long periods at a time. However he was still angry, and perhaps his anger was justified. "If that wasn't your goal, I insist you learn how to howl better so that it does not disturb others. If you are trying to hurt others' ears, I insist you stop it immediately. I don't have the time or patience to deal with that sound while I walk, my work is hard enough as it is without fellows like you to distract me. Certainly you must understand that some hold their work in high regard and do not like to be disturbed?" K.'s words flowed out so easily, his voice was sharp but because of the amount of his words one began to wonder which was greater-his anger or his liking to hear himself talk.

Word Count: 810
Table Picture © Aurorasoul


"Follow your most intense passions mercilessly."
-Franz Kafka
Avatar Picture © DannyWS


#3
Heyoka

Heyoka
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Heyoka had howled his coyote howl, a howl that, to many, often sounded more like a strange laugh, or cackle, than a howl. At least in the way he was howling now. It was not a beautiful, graceful song like that of a wolf. Heyoka lacked melody, but he didn't think so. Besides, he liked the way he howled. He didn't stop when he heard the rapid paw-steps of a dog approaching, but the corners of his lips pulled back into a grin he could hardly contain. When the dog started jabbering, Heyoka stopped howling to listen, and when he did, his toothy grin grew wider, his yellow-green eyes glimmered.

What a funny dog! And such funny colors. Dogs were always funny colors. Colors that made no sense to the coyote. Humans liked those funny colors, but humans were just as strange as dogs. Heyoka laughed at the black and white dog. What ridiculous questions. "What a silly dog you are! Black and white, no shades of gray, but your mind's all full of clatter!" He sprang at the dog, landing close, snapping his teeth together, and then bounding away laughing.

"Oh me, oh my. Me, me, me!" The coyote sprang back up on top of the rock. "Yes, you are a silly dog. Did the humans fill up your mind with their nonsense?" He reached up with one paw, drawing it over one of his long ears and pulling it down over his head, and then releasing it to spring back into it's normal position. Heyoka jumped back down from the rock, trotting around the dog, tongue lolling from his mouth as he grinned and laughed.

"It really is so sad that my howling disrupted your thoughts. That work you do, it must be ever so important. Are you holding the ground down? Or the sky up? Here, let me help you." Heyoka continued dancing around the dog, always ready to spring away should the dog get angry and try to lunge at him, for he knew what he was about to do would aggravate the dog further. He began to howl, sharp, short notes, mixed with a sort of bark. It sounded like a cackle mixed with a scream. "Where are you moon, so white and bright? But what? You're sleeping? Why, I didn't know! I will sing a song early to wake you, and to chase the sun away! Away! Away! Away! Ha Ha! Ha Ha!"

Heyoka, bounded back up onto the rock on light paws and began howling loudly, making as much noise as he could. What a silly dog. Coyotes didn't howl exclusively at the moon, and Heyoka hadn't ever thought of a time when he had ever really sang to that bright, silvery face in the night sky. But why not now? Sing to sister Moon. Father Sun would want to cover his precious ears while Heyoka picked his worse notes, purposefully making his howling sharper, and higher pitched. As soon as it began, Heyoka stopped, and cocked his head, and stared at the black and white dog.

The trickster, the clown, Heyoka was probably not regarded highly for his honesty, or his morality, but he wouldn't be a coyote if he was. "How was that, Blabber-Dog? Did that make it better?" He laughed, clearly enjoying himself. "Shall I sing a working song next to help you work? Work, work, work!"


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#4
Kay

Kay
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I walked ten thousand miles, ten thousand miles to see you,
And every gasp of breath I grabbed at just to find you,

{{OCC: ----'}}

I climbed up every hills to get to you,
I wondered ancient lands to hold just you.

"What a silly dog you are! Black and white, no shades of gray, but your mind's all full of clatter! Oh me, oh my. Me, me, me! Yes, you are a silly dog. Did the humans fill up your mind with their nonsense?"

Already K. regretted his decision to open his mouth and speak to this dog. It wasn't a dog, it was a coyote, but K. didn't care for specifics at this time. All he cared was that this thing, this annoying pest, had ruined his mind's concentration. K.'s eyes followed the coyote as he bounded all around like am immature child, oh how K. disliked him already. He wanted to continue on his way, but K. had the feeling - call it a hunch - that this fellow would either make such a racket that K. would get nothing done even from miles away, or the annoying furred insect would follow him. Neither of these things were to K.'s liking, he had no need for 'assistants' that were the likes of this dog. This canine. Sighing, K. lifted a paw in disgust in order to 'dodge' the snapping of the coyote's jaws. The collie mix was not at all impressed, however he began to believe he was not supposed to be. When the coyote continued his laughter (which K. hated), the collie decided to bark as loud as he could over the sound. "At least my head is full of thoughts and ideas, not empty like yours. The humans have nothing to do with me, and I have nothing to do with them. I suggest you shush yourself, you imbecile." In fact the humans had everything to do with K., but K. did not have a close relationship with them. The way K. pronounced the word 'imbecile' was amusing as well, as he pronounced each syllable; im-bee-cile.

"It really is so sad that my howling disrupted your thoughts. That work you do, it must be ever so important. Are you holding the ground down? Or the sky up? Here, let me help you. Where are you moon, so white and bright? But what? You're sleeping? Why, I didn't know! I will sing a song early to wake you, and to chase the sun away! Away! Away! Away! Ha Ha! Ha Ha!"

If K. were human he would have rubbed his brow in irritation and aggravation. He would have pushed the annoying voice away, out of his his path, and continued on his way. But K. was not human, and found himself being circled by this coyote. K.'s ears were held against his head, already he winced at the coyote's loud sounds, and he wished he could have cut the coyote off so that he did not begin to 'sing'. His eyes were the exact picture of seriousness pushed too far, and his fur was standing on end. Oh how he wanted to attack the coyote! But he knew he wouldn't win, he knew he would get no where with this idiot. If he wanted to get anything done he would have to ask someone far above the coyote, but for now he had to continue to lecture him. "Stop talking, shut your jaws. I am in fact holding up the earth on which you stand. My work is extremely important and you have ruined almost a day's amount of it. A day's, do you know what that may mean? That may mean that another traveler, not so friendly and as tolerant as I, might wander up this road, and with a snicker-sack, lop off your head and go galloping back!" His reference to the Jabberwocky was purely coincidence, he was angry and his seriousness did not allow him to realise he had paraphrased the poem. "And you will gladly go, won't you? You rapscallionious thing! That grin of yours should not exist, you should not exist. You are an intruder and do not belong here." K. became so very infuriated, it would not have mattered to K. if Heyoka was in fact a native of Japan, he would have said the very same things. K. could not understand why it was so hard to get some sort of quiet. He needed it, needed it desperately, or the order of the very country might fall down. Maybe Heyoka found this prospect amusing, but K. most certainly did not.

"How was that, Blabber-Dog? Did that make it better? Shall I sing a working song next to help you work? Work, work, work!"

For a moment K. had hoped that the coyote would have jumped onto that rock and left him alone. But he was not so lucky, it seemed. K.'s ears fell so far back on his head that one may think they would have fallen off, and he cowered at the impact of the sound waves. Oh how he hated it! Why did the coyote toy with him so? Eventually he would lose his patience and have to attack, but K. was not meant to be a fighter. He was meant to walk, simple as that. To walk and measure, to know the numbers of Japan inside and out, starting firstly with Ohu. But the howling pierced his brain and made K. so frustrated that had he a gun he would have fired it right at Heyoka, and if Heyoka were out of range, he would have turned the gun's barrel upon himself. A gunshot was more melodious (and shorter) than the short howl Heyoka unleashed upon the world. No wonder humans hunted coyotes, were all as annoying as this one? If so, K. would have been first in line to do away with them, but to do away with them meant taking a break from his duty, and he could not have that, either. So he was damned to eternal suffering. When the hideous noise was over, ad K. was able to grab at the last bits of sanity he had left, he snarled, "No! No you may not sing a working song. Shut up, shut up, shut up! How about that? How about a quiet song? Maybe the humans and others dogs won't find you if you remain silent. And I could go on my way, or more likely restart my way, and come back this way again, and when I do, I won't see you, and the world will be a better place. You can go on living and so can I, without being deaf. Or shall you continue on this way and irritate the whole world? If their guns don't hit you their pets' fangs will. I am not one to resort to violence, but you are a most disrespectful being and deserve to understand that no one wishes to hear you sing! Not all birds are song birds! Some are hawks that snatch them right out of the sky! How would you like that?"

Word Count: 1155
Table Picture © Aurorasoul


"Follow your most intense passions mercilessly."
-Franz Kafka
Avatar Picture © DannyWS


#5
Heyoka

Heyoka
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To K., Heyoka was the one bounding around like an immature child, but to Heyoka, the black and white dog was the one that was in need of a lesson. So serious. So like a human. But dogs were like humans, at least the ones Heyoka had seen, so it really wasn't all that much of a surprise to him. So boring, so boring. He didn't even make any funny noises like that silly fox. Oh ho! How me loved that fox for his upset sounds. All the foxes in all of Japan would need to beware of the coyote obsessed with gekkering. If he saw another fox, he would be sure to get it upset enough to make those sounds. But this dog. Oh! What a pain. He needed to laugh more, he needed to not take life so seriously. Even Heyoka's snapping jaws didn't get more than a disdainful lift of the paw. He's more human than I thought!

And even as Heyoka laughed in his strange, high pitched way, the dog began to bark loudly, “At least my head is full of thoughts and ideas, not empty like yours. The humans have nothing to do with me, and I have nothing to do with them. I suggest you shush yourself, you imbecile.”

Oh! Oh! Heyoka lowered his ears, feigning a hurt expression. “Oh my mind, my poor mind. Empty as the sky on a hot summer day,” then the coyote started laughing again, springing up onto his hind legs, mocking humans and their silliness. “Oh! But don't you know? Humans and me? We have everything do do with each other!” The coyote hopped around in a circle on his hind legs, realizing how amusing it was to bounce around like that. “Why, the humans taught me how to speak their language! They taught me how to open doors! They taught me all sorts of things, and then they said, 'Heyoka, you are a smart coyote, yes you are, but you know, your fur is so much prettier than the ones we wear. We'd like to have it.'” The coyote made exaggerated facial expressions as he spoke, deepening his voice to play the role of the human. Then Heyoka dropped onto all fours and cowered on his belly, looking up at where he had been standing. “'Well that won't do, human. That won't do at all. I need my fur, I don't have all of those different furs to wear like you.'” And do you know what? I left. I opened my cage door and walked out.

Heyoka stood up and walked forward, right up to the border collie. “Walked. Out. Just like that. They probably miss me. I'd miss me.” Heyoka laughed, lolling his tongue out and throwing his head back to howl one short note. He looked back at the black and white dog, with his irritated expression and his ears held so tight against his head that they looked like they didn't exist at all. Yes. He was a silly looking dog.

“Stop talking, shut your jaws. I am in fact holding up the earth on which you stand. My work is extremely important and you have ruined almost a day's amount of it. A day's, do you know what that may mean? That may mean that another traveler, not so friendly and as tolerant as I, might wander up this road, and with a snicker-sack, lop off your head and go galloping back!”

Oh ho! Heyoka laughed at how serious the dog was. Did he honestly think that Heyoka would believe that he was holding up the earth? Ha! And the more the dog talked, the more content Heyoka grew. He actually was beginning to sound funny! “Ha. Ha ha ha ha ha!” Heyoka began to laugh uncontrollably. He couldn't believe that the dog actually had it in him to be funny, even with that dark humor. But Heyoka's entire existence was the face on both sides of the coin. Though he was a funny creature by nature, Heyoka was known to screw things up to make things not so pleasant for whoever it was that was so happy. He didn't always make sense, in fact, most of the time he didn't make sense, but he didn't need to.

“And you will gladly go, won't you? You rapscallionious thing! That grin of yours should not exist, you should not exist. You are an intruder and do not belong here.”

Heyoka could honestly not get himself to stop laughing. He wasn't sure what was more funny. How serious the dog was, or how serious the dog thought he was. Serious humans, and dogs, were strange, always taking everything with such grim expressions, and always angry at those who didn't look as grim as they. And Heyoka? All he could do was laugh at them. And what was worse for those serious, grim-faced creatures, was that Heyoka's laugh was not mocking. All the way down to the bottom of his heart, Heyoka found the absurdity of it all hilarious. But Heyoka hadn't even heard the best part yet. The black and white dog, apparently at his wits' end, snarled. and snapped, ranting and raving about trees-know-what, something about shutting up, and something about humans and guns, about the dog coming back and Heyoka not being there, about a quiet song, and something about not all birds being song birds. Blabber, blabber, blabber. The dog spoke more than a chickadee in the spring, and almost as much as a human. That was it! He talked more than any normal dog, he talked like a human. He talked to hear himself talk, Heyoka was sure of it!

“Whaaaaaat?” Heyoka cocked his head to the side in a very exaggerated manner, splaying his ears out on the sides of his head. “What about song birds and hawks, Blabber-dog?” There was something beneath the glittering amusement in his eyes, it was a hungry predatory gleam, and he pulled his lips back to reveal yellowing teeth in an equally hungry grin.


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#6
Kay

Kay
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I walked ten thousand miles, ten thousand miles to see you,
And every gasp of breath I grabbed at just to find you,

{{OCC: ----}}

I climbed up every hill to get to you,
I wandered ancient lands to hold just you.


“Oh my mind, my poor mind. Empty as the sky on a hot summer day. Oh! But don't you know? Humans and me? We have everything do do with each other! Why, the humans taught me how to speak their language! They taught me how to open doors! They taught me all sorts of things, and then they said, 'Heyoka, you are a smart coyote, yes you are, but you know, your fur is so much prettier than the ones we wear. We'd like to have it. 'Well that won't do, human. That won't do at all. I need my fur, I don't have all of those different furs to wear like you.'” And do you know what? I left. I opened my cage door and walked out."

So on the coyote went, in his flair for the dramatic, preforming a one man play all by himself for the torture of K. Oh maybe some dogs would have been amused, or would have applauded how this coyote was brilliant enough to escape the humans! But K. was not amused at all, he wished the humans would have made him into a fur coat, he would be much more worthwhile then. Much more quiet and not at all in the border collie mix's way! However K. decided it would be rude to say this for the moment, even though Heyoka did deserve to be lectured about how he should mind his manners, but he was still strongly displeased. His ears sat back on his head, and the two different coloured eyes seemed to roll endlessly out of simple disgust for the lower being's performance. So much time had been wasted, and K. wanted to leave, desperately, wanted to exit stage left while the fellow went on with his charades that were so pointless. He was losing precious, precious daylight, and soon K. would have to find food, and then a place to sleep. How could he do any of this if this coyote seemed to believe that time was a thing to be wasted?

“Walked. Out. Just like that. They probably miss me. I'd miss me."

However this dog-canine, dog, wolf, whatever he was K. hardly cared-seemed to go out of his way to make it hard for K. to ignore him, and hope that he still had good behavior. Heyoka pushed K. to his breaking point so very easily, making it hard for K. to at least try to give Heyoka any sort of benefits. When the coyote dared to approach him, and dared to speak about how he simply walked on out, the border collie offered him a sharp snarl, barring his fangs in a most vicious manner. "I for one hoped they had made a coat out of you, you would be much more useful and much more quiet, then. You deserve nothing more than to be made a coat, or hat, or anything else as long as you are dead and as quiet as the grave!" The howling note Heyoka produced only made K. shake with annoyance, "shut up! Shut up you most disgraceful being! I wouldn't miss you at all! I would be glad that you were gone!" But K. was not that lucky, was he? No, for it seemed he was doomed to yell at a wall that only laughed at his presence. Oh if K. were only more of a fighter, he would snap at the throat of the annoying coyote, but as it were, K. was simply one to fight with words and to be easily insulted with little walk behind it.

“Ha. Ha ha ha ha ha! Whaaaaaat? What about song birds and hawks, Blabber-dog?"

That nonstop laughter! The destructive sound in K.'s ears was so painful; he could hardly hear himself think with the laughing Cheshire. K. had no desire to be the Alice in this Wonderland, but it seemed that he had already gone down the rabbit hole and it was not yet time for him to wake up. "You heard me, you harlequin! And if you didn't, all the better, for your laughter should be the death of you. It would put me at peace, for sure. It would put everyone at peace, and those of us who have a sense of duty in their lives can continue on! We won't have to be bothered by the likes of you, as I am sure there are more of you. The faster you all die out, the better! If you press your luck with the wrong dog you will be slaughtered, and I hope to find your body so I can laugh at it in my most obnoxious way!" K. was so very annoyed, so very angry. He hardly cared that Heyoka was thinking him to be like a human; that was not on K.'s focused and obsessed mind. He wanted Heyoka to be silent, and wanted to ramble long and loud enough so that the clown could have a taste of just how annoying he was. K. hoped that eventually the coyote would walk away and move on; similar to a human who yells long enough at yowling cats. K. was indeed very human, but was denied the ability to be human, which was all for the better for he may have a gun on him for these situations where coyotes began to talk and laugh with and at him for no other reason than their own amusement. How dare they find humour in a world that K. tried so hard to make logical and reasonable?

Word Count: 932
Table Picture © Aurorasoul


"Follow your most intense passions mercilessly."
-Franz Kafka
Avatar Picture © DannyWS





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